Short Stories, Writing

Liminal world of Inuit folklore

I have been writing a new short fiction work inspired by the liminal folklore in some Inuit cultures. The liminal folklore I was interested to explore are closely linked to the harsh environment of northern Canada, from the permafrost and sea ice, where the risks from exposure and isolation are very real. The First Nations are the indigenous peoples of Canada and the Inuit “the People” occupy the traditional northernmost lands- called Inuit Nunangat, encompassing the northwest territories, northern Labrador and northern Quebec, consisting of 35% of Canada’s landmass and 50% of the coastline. To the Inuit, the land, water and ice are vital parts of the whole.

In a landscape of treacherous sea ice, blizzards and permafrost, traditional stories are told throughout generations to provide warnings for the dangers in disobeying laws and customs which are often closely tied to the history and landscape. There are several different beings in Inuit folklore that prey upon those who stray from the camp, children who become lost and the disorientating danger of the permafrost. Among these are the Taqriaqsuit or the “shadow people”, beings who are invisible or half-seen, who are heard but not seen but where a veil must be crossed between our world and their own. Beings also exist beneath the the sea ice, the Qallupilluk are child-snatchers who prey on children who stray too close to the dangerous frozen waterways and pack ice.

My latest short fiction work has been an interesting endeavour to explore unforgiving natural environments and internal psychological upheaval where the liminal world of the Taqriaqsuit and the Qallupilluk merges with the eerie north Canadian landscape and half-seen beings of folklore become a new reality.

Short Stories, Writing

Fantasy novella & mythic parallels

I recently finished a novella inspired from my initial research for my latest novel draft Ragnarok Dreaming into Norse mythology and Australian Aboriginal legends. On the surface, there might seem little in common between the Viking legends and those of the oldest continuous culture on the planet. The purpose of the novella was not to re-tell any stories or legends, because these are not my ancestry nor mine to tell, instead, I wanted to explore the common elements shared between them. The themes that unite all humanity across time and place. In this, I was drawn as I often am, to the fascinating Trickster figures in legends and stories throughout the world. In Norse mythology, Loki is the Trickster figure and protagonist of the novella relocated into a cosmos inspired by Australian dreaming stories. The Trickster figure who aids Loki is Wahn, the Crow in many Aboriginal legends. The novella was a re-imagining of the parallels and opposites in legends and myth, expanding on what was interesting research for Ragnarok Dreaming.

reads, Recent Reads

Metamorphosis: Short Stories

I recently read Metamorphosis: A Collection of Short Stories by Australian author Claire Fitzpatrick.
I do not commonly read Horror fiction, so I am probably a bit unfamiliar with the development of themes in “body horror” fiction. However, I was really intrigued by the different stories in this collection, appreciating the originality and scope. I was particularly interested in the way, Metamorphosis stepped-away from the more common gothic and classic “shock” tropes of zombies, aliens, necromancy, shape-shifters, mutations and the ‘grotesques’ in depraved scientific experiments. What Metamorphosis contained were stories which reflected elements of those classic biological horror themes, but delved deeper into the psychological unease experienced by all facets of society, intent on exploring some disturbing aspects of our “modern” sociocultural paradigm.
Metamorphosis is surely why Claire Fitzpatrick is referred to as the “Australian Body Horror Specialist”. The combination of classic biological horror fiction with the elegant psychological unease indebted to Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein is a style of Horror fiction that seeks to find the monstrous in society but also to examine the unspoken fears and potential horrors in our “modern” society. If you dare, it’s a highly recommended read!

research, Short Stories, stories, Writing

Writing for Leo (Zodiac Series, #8)

In July 2020, my Gaslamp fantasy “The Golden Lion-Monkey” was published in short story anthology Leo (The Zodiac Series, #8) by Deadset Press. When not exploring myth and history, I am pursuing a PhD in human and primate evolution. When writing “The Golden Lion-Monkey”, I’ve combined my interests in history and fantasy fiction with my expertise in evolutionary Primatology.


My main character Rosanna Corrano is a wealthy heiress but in my alternate Victorian era society, she can keep her inheritance only through marriage and where the inheritance becomes the property of her her future-husband. Rosanna has long been struggling against societal confines and developed an alternate male persona, Dr Leo who as a man the Victorian society can achieve the education, respect and freedom that Rosanna cannot. Through courtship with a wealthy man, an owner of a London printing press, Rosanna begins to realise her persona as Dr Leo is not entirely fictitious, she is both Rosanna and Leo, her existence has become a duality.

In my story “The Golden Lion-Monkey”, my inspiration for a female scientist in the Victorian era was in-part drawn from the historical figure of fossil hunter Mary Anning. Like many women of her time, without money, social status and a husband, Mary Anning had few options. She was very poor and unmarried but she supported herself by selling shells on the Lyme Regis coast in Dorset county. She was also involved with providing ancient fossils she discovered on the Dorset coast to male scientists. Her expertise at fossil hunting was so good that many scientists owed careers and great discoveries to her and she was consulted for her knowledge of the anatomy in many of the giant fossil marine vertebrates she discovered. Victorian society prevented Mary from being a member of the Geological Society (women weren’t admitted until 1904) nor could she be a professional natural scientist like her male counterparts. But even in her lifetime, her significant contribution was recognised with the members from the British Association for the Advancement of Science and the Geological Society of London arranging payment of an annual stipend to support Mary. Despite this, she was not listed as an author on any of the scientific discoveries she contributed to. Although some women in Victorian society did have careers as authors, artists and scientists, they were few and often socially ostracised for the choice. It is certainly true that higher social status and wealth allowed more independence over the uncertainty of survival. Ada Lovelace was the daughter of English poet Lord Byron and Annabella Byron and an engineer, inventor, author and mathematician, but her individual circumstance was very rare.

In the confines of society where women were unable to support themselves without a husband or pursue a life of their own, I drew inspiration for my character of Rosanna from female historical figures who disguised themselves as men to either pursue a employment, express their sexual orientation and in some cases marry or to embrace the duality of their own gender. I was initially inspired by the historical fiction novel Goddess by Kelly Gardiner which explores some of the life of seventeenth century Frenchwoman Julie d’Aubigny.

In my story, “The Golden Lion-Monkey”, Doctor Leo describes a new species of monkey from the Brazilian jungles, refuting claims by other scientists that such a marvellous creature must be Fae in origin. The other scientists consider the tiny monkey so impossibly unique it must be Fae rather than a non-magical creature. Among the scientists, Doctor Leo considers the uniqueness of the lion-monkey as a wonder itself, beyond any magic.
The inspiration for the monkey described in my story comes from a real-life tiny primate native to the jungles of Brazil. Although I have changed the scientific name of the monkey described in my story, the tiny monkey closely resembles the highly endangered Golden Lion Tamarin found in the jungles surrounding Rio de Janero, Brazil. The plight of these tamarin monkeys is dire with latest estimates suggesting as few as 1,400 adults in the wild. This species of tamarin is not found anywhere else in South America and their numbers are decreasing.


My Gaslamp fantasy “The Golden Lion-Monkey” is published in Leo (Zodiac Series, #8) by Deadset Press alongside other great speculative fiction from Australian and New Zealand authors.

Short Stories, Writing

Forthcoming: Leo Zodiac Anthology

I am pleased to announce my Gaslamp Fantasy story “The Golden Lion-Monkey” will be published in the forthcoming speculative fiction anthology Leo (Zodiac Series, #8) inspired by the Zodiac and published by Deadset Press from Aussie Speculative Fiction.

Leo (Zodiac Series, #8) is available now for preorder and will be released as an ebook from 25th July featuring many other great speculative fiction stories and poems from Australian and New Zealand authors.

reads, Recent Reads

Darkdawn

I recently read Darkdawn, the third and final instalment in the Nevernight Chronicle by Australian author Jay Kristoff.
Darkdawn follows from the preceding volume Godsgrave where protagonist, the assassin Mia Corvere has succeeded in her plans on the arena sands of the grand gladiatorial games in Godsgrave. But Mia’s plans were not as unforeseen as she had hoped. With the Blades of the Red Church on her heels, her young brother Jonnen resisting his liberation from Consul Scaeva and Cardinal Duomo’s corpse behind her, Godsgrave erupts into chaos where Consul Scaeva takes control of the Republic as Imperitor, a king in all but name. As Mia plans to rescue her old mentor Mecuro used as bait in a trap laid for her within the protection of the Red Church, Mia must use all her skills as an assassin, help from her friends in the collegium, her lover Ashlinn, and master the skills of her darkin heritage to defeat Scaeva and finally avenge her familia. Hardest challenge of them all, Mia must try not to lose who she is in the process. Darkdawn is a dramatic conclusion to the adventures of the Nevernight Chronicle, the characters and plot staying true to intention, still maintaining a high-octane adventure with a satisfying conclusion. Kristoff is true to his characters and this fabulous series is not for the faint of heart. Highly recommended read!

Short Stories, stories

Gaslamp Fantasy & Victorian Science

I have been interested by several different stories recently in the Alternate History subgenres of Steampunk and Gaslamp Fantasy. My latest short story draws on my academic knowledge of the Victorian era expansion in science and natural history. Gaslamp Fantasy is a subgenre I really enjoy and was inspired to write an alternate history exploring Victorian London society, the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution, emergence of modern sciences and the continuation of Fae creatures amid an expanding British Empire and colonisation. The Victorian era saw the beginning of Industrialisation, women’s liberation movements but also technological advancement, interest in the natural sciences and geological age of the planet. This is only some of the context for a story exploring social expectations and a female heiress who moonlights as a male scientist and a purported new species of tree-dwelling, cat-sized Fae lion.

events, Writing

Continuum 15, 2019

I attended Continuum15/NatCon 58 convention in Melbourne from June 7-10, 2019. The convention is an annual event for the Australian speculative fiction community. This was my first Continuum convention and I was looking forward to the many expert panels, workshops, Markets, the Maskbalao, Ditmar Awards, Shadows Awards & Norma K Hemming Awards. 

Ticket pricing was very generous with special rates for First Time attendees and Friday evening. More information available  here


I spoke on two panels:


Magical Medicine: The Physiology of Fantasy  – Friday 7pm

What options does a twenty-foot dragon have for actually getting airborne? What ailments could trouble a angel? How would you handle a chimera with a cold, and just how *does* a centaur’s digestive system work? 

Speakers: 
ZFreya MarskeAlannah K. PearsonPrema

June 7, 2019, 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Hall: Pluto


Illness in SFF  – Saturday 10 am

Future sci fi seems to always have “Medical technology has wiped out disease” or “A plague is wiping out humanity”, why do we not hear about common ailments and the oddities of medical care in space and across multiple species?

Speakers: 
ZAlannah K. PearsonAndi BuchananMargaret Morgan

June 8, 2019, 10:00 am to 11:00 am
Hall: Pluto


There are also some wonderful workshops & talks by the guests of honour. Come join me in the audience!


Workshop: Writing Fight Scenes For Women – Sunday 10 am

Speaker: 
Aiki Flinthart

June 9, 2019, 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Barrayar Track: Workshops


Kate Elliott: Reading and Signing – Sunday 2 pm

Join Kate Elliott for a reading, followed by Q&A and book signing.

Speaker: 
Kate Elliott

June 9, 2019, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Hall: Magrathea Track: Guest of Honour


Ken Liu: Reading and Signing – Sunday 3 pm

Join Ken Liu for a reading, followed by Q&A and book signing.

Speaker: 
Ken Liu

June 9, 2019, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: Magrathea Track: Guest of Honour


events, Writing

Aurealis Awards 2018


On May 4 2019, I attended the 2018 Aurealis Awards in Melbourne, an annual awards ceremony for works published that year from members of the Australian speculative fiction community. This was my first Aurealis Awards and I was thrilled to be part of the iconic Australian Speculative Fiction Awards. My self-published Fantasy novel Bone Arrow was entered and really enjoyed meeting members of the Australian speculative fiction community, from the emerging writers and the more established among them.

The 2018 Award winners & Judges Comments here


Thanks to Cat Sparks for the wonderful photos of the awards & aftermath!